Archive for the ‘Former Exhibitions’ Category

Metepec Site Specific

Cactus column in construction

 

A massive freestanding cactus column, measuring the sum of the eight pillars of the atrium, rises to the air  from the centre of the 16th Century convent of St. John at Metepec. Within the column, water is contained in clay jars representing the Baptist and the nymphaea that people have seen in this rural area. A sound installation surrounds this organic architectural structure.

 

 

 

 


Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box / edition of 3 / tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm

Anatomic Dream

 

Resting anonymously over the dusty shelves of a Department of Pathological Anatomy of an ancient Italian Faculty of Medicine; hidden in the forensic cabinets, or scattered in an empty room of a General Hospital, the forgotten remains of unidentified human beings that lived hundreds of years ago lie in silence, defying death, trapped in an eternal dream: suspended in formaldehyde, stuffed or petrified. These “unknown” beings, whose images have never been embedded on a tombstone, preserve their morphological characteristics intact. Following an Old Italian funerary tradition, they recover a certain identity when their photographic image is printed on small porcelain tiles. Then, these are inserted into wooden and glass cabinets which are placed over “anatomic tables”.

 

Museums & Galleries

Señales Rojas
Fondazione Volume-IILA
Curator: Patricia Rivadeneira
Rome, 2010

 

Other Participants: Jota Castro, Regina Galindo, Jorge Pineda, María Rosa Jijón, Emilio Leofreddi,
Manuela Viera-Gallo y Camilo Yáñez

 

 


Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo nos presenta la reciente obra “Sueño anatómico“. Son imágenes fotográficas sobre porcelana, instaladas en una mesa de madera y vidrio estilo museo de las ciencias, con figuras de fetos deformados o muertos al nacer.

Nuestra cultura nos obliga a esconder los muertos, pero es extraño cómo estos “seres” puedan ser museificados en virtud del hecho que no habiendo “nacido” no son efectivamente muertos.  No son “seres” sino sueños anatómicos…Sin embargo están ahí, perfectos para convertirse en una metáfora ontológica.

Cuando la cultura retrocede tanto como para no consentir al Otro la dignidad de ser, cuando el lenguaje pierde el contacto con la vida verdadera, con lo orgánico, cuando el sueño del patriarcado se opone a la fertilidad de la mujer, entonces aparecen los monstruos.

¿Pero, es la vida que nos está atacando o es el sueño de nuestra razón?

Patricia Rivadeneira, Roma, 2010
Publicación  “Señales Rojas”, Edizioni Volume!


Sull’identità è incentrato il Sonno Anatomico. Tavolo dei neonati, opera del messicano Alejandro Gomez de Tuddo, che rappresenta bambini mai nati (e quindi, in un certo senso, mai morti), parte di un progetto più ampio che include il Tavolo delle donne e il Tavolo degli uomini. Un lavoro che nasce da quella che Gomez de Tuddo definisce quasi un’ossessione feticista per tutto ciò che rientra nella tipologia del reperto: una ricerca, quindi, di tipo archeologica. “Nei magazzini, depositi, armadi delle vecchie università italiane ho trovato reperti del ‘700 e ‘800 che, solitamente, non vengono mostrati al pubblico – ci spiega – individui dimenticati di cui, però, ancora oggi possiamo vederne i resti. Il fatto di rifotografare questi esseri in perfetto stato di conservazione, stampando l’immagine sulle piastrelle di porcellana bianca, di quelle usate dai marmisti dei cimiteri, è un modo per recuperarne l’identità, e con questa anche la dignità. Questi corpi sono come sospesi, avvolti nella dimensione del sonno e rimangono protetti nelle rispettive teche, come in una Wunderkammern.”


 

Artwork Description & Technical Specifications

 

Three wood and glass tables. Four halogen lamps, four wood and glass boxes and four photographic prints on porcelain tiles, over each table.

Anatomic Table I (Children’s Table)
(Edition of 3)

1. Anatomic Dream I, Florence, 2008
Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box, 1/3
Tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm

2. Anatomic Dream II, Florence, 2008
Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box, 1/3
Tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm

3. Anatomic Dream III, Florence, 2008
Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box, 1/3
Tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm

4. Anatomic Dream IV, Florence, 2008
Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box, 1/3
Tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm


Photographic print on porcelain / tile 15 x 23 cm / box 20 x 26 cm Photographic print on porcelain / tile 15 x 23 cm / box 20 x 26 cm Photographic print on porcelain / tile 15 x 23 cm / box 20 x 26 cm Photographic print on porcelain / tile 15 x 23 cm / box 20 x 26 cm

 

Anatomic Table II (Adults’ Table)
(Edition of 3)

1. Anatomic Dream V, Florence, 2008
Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box, 1/3
Tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm

2. Anatomic Dream VI, Florence, 2008
Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box, 1/3
Tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm

3. Anatomic Dream VII, Florence, 2008
Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box, 1/3
Tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm

4. Anatomic Dream VIII, Florence, 2008
Photographic print on porcelain, in wood & cristal box, 1/3
Tile 15 x 23 cm, box 20 x 26 cm


Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.82 x 1.20 m

VMBRA PROFVNDA SVMVS

“The shadow prepares the sight for light. Through the shadow, the Divine Temples place before the darkened eye of the hungry and thirsty soul, such images that are the messangers of things. Try then to recognize shadows that never extinguish, but preserve and keep in within ourselves the light; throughout which we are guided and reconducted to the intellect and the memory.”

Giordano Bruno, De umbris idearum, 1582

 

Mutating and adapting to the different exhibition spaces, the installation which started in Berlin, at the Berliner Festspiele, has been presented in several other cities, such as Rome, Monterrey and Mexico City.

The title for the series of photographs and installations comes from the words of Giordano Bruno The Nolan:
“Vmbra profvnda svmvs” (Deep Shadows We Are), taken from his hermetic text “Shadows of the Ideas”.

 

 

Museums & galleries

Filottete (in progress)
Istituto Svizzero  di Roma, Villa Maraini
Curator: Francesco Florentino
Rome, 2004

Tödliches Spiel: das Leben
Bewag Halle-Prenzlauerberg (Berliner Festspiele)
Curators: Wolfgang Storch & Klaudia Ruschkowski
Berlin, 2004
    

 

    

 

There are no titles, only indications of the place and year of the photograph: Saigon 2002, Tehran 2004, Naples 2003. The photographic eye of Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo captures traces of an almost archaic,  daily, and universal violence: bodies of animals reduced to shreds, slaughtered or sacrificed in rituals that survive into our postmodern times; living creatures that other living creatures kill for nourishment or simply to ingratiate themselves; beings that only exist in the imaginary.
This is what these photographs force us to see: the brutal evidence of life being violated, the violence of men and their culture. The photographic glance of Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo presents us crude but elegant images, with an almost obscene elegance which causes a profound discomfort, because it forces us to endure the scandalous fascination of beauty arising from horror. It makes our very skin feel the scandal of art transforming into poetry, the crude reality of death, suffered or inflicted; the cruel game of life devouring itself. However, without disturbing us, this scandalous art makes us think and feel, with an almost unbearable intensity of the horror of this world, by displaying it and at the same time concealing it, hidden within a beauty which connects us intimately with it, because it deactivates our usual removal mechanisms, exposing us to the senseless cruelty of human culture and allowing us to perceive in it —in ourselves— something transcending it: the irreducible desire of another state of the world, perennially speaking through beauty; in a need for beauty that never stops, not even before the most terrible manifestations of life being perturbed by irreparable, unredeemable violence.  Gómez de Tuddo’s work never allows violence the last word; he knows how to remove something that in a certain way redeems it, without erasing the terribleness; something that, together with an anguishing and crushing sadness, is occasionally capable of transmitting an awkward joy. In the case of the playful photograph of a goat hanging from a Palermo market stand, we see it jumping out from a reddish-orange background. It seems as if though the animal were almost flying away from the blood bath in which its life was drowned, as if its life had not been taken away but continues to be, outside itself, beyond itself, in an unattainable somewhere. It is precisely towards such an unreachable place that Alejandro’s photographs lead us to: the nowhere of a life that is no longer life, but which is not, however, non-existent. It exists, but is eternally foreign and still accompanies us always and everywhere, though always and everywhere, distant from us, both from the being and from nothing.

Francesco Fiorentino, Berlin, 2004

 

Bewag Halle
  
       
Gioco mortale: la vita
Istituto Italo Latinoamericano (IILA)
Gallery: Scuderie del Palazzo Santa Croce
Curator: Irma Arestizábal
Rome, 2005
Installation  de umbris idearum Bruno   

 


VMBRA PROFVNDA SVMVS I
Centro de las Artes Monterrey – Fototeca- Parque Fundidora
Curator: Loretto Garza Zambrano
Monterrey, 2005

Uroboros-Basilisco / Centro de las Artes Monterrey / ISBN 970-9887-01-7 Centro de las Artes, Monterrey, 2005

 

Gomez de Tuddo is one of the now rare breed of visual artists that rely on the wondrous serendipity of chance encounters. He can’t censor his own discomfort by embellishing the result. But as you gaze, you know you are not being exploited by the intention to nauseate or disgust, to sensationalize by playing on a viewer’s inner guilt. His subject may be the slaughtered, the excreted, the neglected beings, places or things in our everyday world. Through these documents of death and decay, he creates an altar to the mysteries inherent to the cycle of creation and destruction without preferential treatment to either. This photographic theater invokes respect and pays homage without sentimentalizing its subject matter. It may be exceptionally beautiful at times, but won’t allow an aesthetic that distances and alienates by petrifying its subject in an amber of artificial light and stylized effects. Even though we are forced to look at these images head on (many are large format with the impact of a mural), we don’t feel coerced or confronted by them. To some they may feel like elegies to the careless attitudes of our post-industrial age. To others they may reveal some secret truth about life, death and eternity. He has the eye and talent to bring his work the aesthetic rigor of still life without being precious or contrived. The images, though, can’t remain static long. They are bathed in saturated colors that sometimes feel primary, but are more chromatic and unstable. You look and are convinced the blue you see belongs to the sky, but Gomez de Tuddo throws narrative into the dynamic that reveals its provenance, a crumbling frescoed wall or the innards of a tunnel. Like all great artists whose work may be instantly accessible and infinitely multilayered, he both seduces with bold imagery and plays a hide-and-seek game with context and meaning. One of his images may seem alive with violence and movement until a blink of the eye fixes it into the stillness
of an icon.

Steven de Sanctis, New York, 2005

 

VMBRA PROFVNDA SVMVS II
Museo de Arte Moderno
Curator: Luis M. Lozano
Mexico City, 2005
 

       Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m

 

Death appears on stage portrayed by an artist who loves Greek tragedy and is inspired by the work of Heiner Müller; surrounded by suggestions and enamel colors – displaying all its terrible fascination.
When death is deprived from its raw appearance and ruthless horror that often comes together, dealing with her shamelessly must be a very difficult task, specially if represented through images of viscera and blood, whose colors are sometimes highlighted with an almost dazzling vivacity.
Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo’s photographs taken around the world disconcert the viewer, creating suggestions that swing between the hardness of the glassy eyes of dead animals to the grace of an ideal esthetic.
On one hand, the idea of decay and death leads to discomfort and anxiety faced with the inevitable; on the other, the artist is able to transform the objects into bodies with new life, while “coating a violent reality with uncomfortable sensuality”, as mentioned by curator Irma Arestizábal in the exhibition’s catalogue.
Antonin Artaud in “Art and Death” approached the “transfer” in carnal terms  -also in sexual terms-, linking it to life through a reciprocal generative moment, and after having embarked on a harrowing journey through the darkness of pain, he is able to get closer and writes: All things, even the most cruel ones, manifest themselves only through their balancing aspect, in a perfect indifference of sense.
The artwork exhibited by Gómez de Tuddo seems to follow a similar path; departing from pain it reaches the representation of a fascinating reality, with the stolid acceptance of who has seen and played the “deadly game of life”.
Even though he might not seem to talk about definitive disappearance, through the strident contrast that characterizes his animals ­-pairing them to organs in formaldehyde often found at the forensic theatre- and the poetic beauty of images such as the bleeding heart, adorned with a candid crown of flowers, the artist is searching for a new definition of death, far away from the idea of otherworldly life, because, basically “the issue” is extremely physical. 

Federica La Paglia, Exibart, Rome, March 22nd, 2005 

 

ARCO, Arco Latino
Parque Ferial Juan Carlos I
Curator: Alfredo Zaya
Madrid, 2005

    Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m

 “Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo’s work among the top ten most interesting proposals on view at ARCO of the more than six thousand works exhibited.”

20 minutos, Madrid, February 11, 2005


“ARCO 2005: The work of Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo stands out…an art that can really be appreciated without needing to display its certificate of origin.”

ABC, Madrid, February 12, 2005 


“Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo with his involving and elliptical gigantographies. Distressing still-lives (animals or organic materials) that detour from their real iconography to become something else: Birds bound forever in love and death, like awesome violet feathers; a goat’s head in a fuchsia net, hanging from the handle bar of a motorcycle over a pop lemon-yellow background from a street wall of Tehran; a dish full of ruby-like blood cubes. Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo is completely independent from the ethno-representation of his identity, he sets apart his image towards the bowels of a sensitive world without national boundaries.”

Teresa Macrí, Il Manifesto, Rome Februrary 17, 2005 

 

“Master of light, color and subject matter, Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo exhibits a series of still-lifes: photographic compositions with a pictorial character, the result of an urban mythology characterized with irony.”

20 minutos, Madrid, February 11, 2005

 

 

Artwork list & technical specifications

Photographs (edition of 7)

1. Rome, Italy, 2005
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

2. Saigon, Vietnam, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.82 x 1.20 m

3. Phonom Penh, Cambodia, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

4. Bangkok, Thailand, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

5. Hanoi, Vietnam, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

6. Luang Prabang, Laos, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

7. Guadalajara, Mexico, 2003
Lambda print, 1/7
1.82 x 1.20 m
8. Naples, Italy, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

9. Seoul, Korea, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

10. Kavar, Iran, 2004
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

11. Hoyan, Vietnam, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.82 x 1.20 m

12. Tehran, Iran, 2004
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

13. Tuscany, Italy, 2003
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

14. Seoul, Korea, 2003
Lambda print, 1/7
1.82 x 1.20 m
15. Palermo, Italy, 2003
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

16. Cuetzalan, Mexico, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

17. Neshabur, Iran, 2004
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

18. Palermo, Italy, 2003
Lambda print, 1/7
1.82 x 1.20 m

19. Teacalco, Mexico, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

20. Cuernavaca, Mexico, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.82 x 1.20 m

21. Cuetzalan, Mexico, 2002
Lambda print, 1/7
1.20 x 1.82 m

22. Tehran, Iran, 2004
Lambda print, 1/7
1.82 x 1.20 m
   

    

                 Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.82 x 1.20 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.8 x 1.20 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m

                 Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.82 x 1.20 m     

                 Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.82 x 1.20 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.82 x 1.20 m  Lambda print / edition of 7 / 1.20 x 1.82 m  

 

         

 

 

 


Lambda print under plexiglass / edition of 3 / 1.20 x 1.80

Field of Depth

 

Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo’s photographs inhabit a place between 
the real and the symbolic. His images are evidence of a personal search for
 social rectification through a sort of visual mourning; a heartfelt investigation on death as sole destiny.
The photographer looks for the life of remnants and assigns through his thorough compositions a ‘spirit’ or voice that leads to metaphysical questions about permanence and transcendence. 
Gómez de Tuddo’s found objects, dead animals and other compositions, are connected with archeology, anthropology and mythology. He relies on formal characteristics such as scale and color to highlight that “the figure of a thing is an essential for the realization of its functions”. This phrase borrowed from Ovid’s Metamorphosis is relavant to Gómez de Tuddo´s work, as his photographs represent figures that are in a stage of final transformation yet retain their metaphorical essence.

Carlos Motta, New York Arts Magazine, September, 2004

Museums & Galleries

 

Field of Depth
Landscape as  a Metaphor in Emerging Photography

Latin Collector Gallery
Curator: Carlos Motta
New York, 2004 

Other participants: Lina Dorado, Ariel Ruiz, Raissa Venables, Jenny Gaulitz, Nicolas Goldberg, Gastos Zvi, Guido Albi, Michelle Kloehn, Roni Mocán, Frank Oudeman, Giada Ripa, Mariana Silva

 


Life Still Circus

Life-still Circus
Supperclub (4Romaeuropafestival)
Rome, 2003

Participants: James Hall, Andy Russ,
Cécile Mainardi & Guillermo Roel


Il faudrait imaginer qu’il ne neige rien en particulier
Qu’il ne neige que l’action de neiger
Autrement dit qu’il se mette à pleuvoir sur Gênes
en plus de la pluie, sa photographique façon de pleuvoir
Il n’y a maintenant plus qu’elle qui nous relie
et nous protège de l’intemperie d’être
à n’importe quel endroit de la ville, l’un sans l’autre

 In a posture of pure unfolding: in the position closest to death

Qu’il neige comme on dirait: il est trois heures
ou dans une ville devenue déserte: il vente
Une neige sans flocon ni particule qui n’enregistre que
la façon exorbitante qu’a le présent de revenir

 In general, I dont remain myself for very long when I kiss you

Qu’il ne neige rien , supposant qu’il neige au moins
quelque chose qui finisse par se passer du présent lui-même
dans les interstices

 I fire a shot into the fucking concrete of ours!

Voilà la neige comme j’aimerais savoir la dessiner.

 

Cécile Mainardi, Rome, 2003



The performance creates three-dimensional installations based upon Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo’s photographs. James Hall’s own interpretation of these images delves into the emptiness that many people feel and into their need to sacrifice and torture themselves, as well as others, as a means of bringing life into their “still-lives”. Thus, the interpretation of the photographs continues its own lineage of thought and emotion. Through sculpting on latex, paint, props, sound & performance, Hall explores the extreme grotesque nature of love, lust, control, competition and abuse. His interest is not to support, condemn or moralize the images seen by the visitors, but to allow each visitor to draw from their personal experiences. Thus, the interpretation of the original photographs continues its lineage of thought and emotion. Guest artists Cécile Mainardi, Guillermo Roel and Andy Russ bring their talents to enhance the creation. Originating from her viewing of the photographs, the words from Mainardi’s poems take life within, on top of and along the performance. The sound score created by Andy Russ inspires the audience via an additional sensory discourse to further explore their journey; while Guillermo Roel’s latest video production is screened during the evening.  The mind of the audience is free to choose and organize the series of photographs, installations, poems, sounds and videos; the connections are their own perceptions. Gómez de Tuddo created a video for this occasion, edited by Carlotta Cerquetti. In the first one, the performers of a small Mexican family circus alternate with the rhythm of the penitents of a medieval religious tradition from the mountains of  Benevento in Italy: purification, atonement, devotion, sacrifice and tears in counterpoint with entertainment, representation, fantasy, illusion and laughter.


 

Life Still Circus (video 1)                                              Life Still Circus (video 2)


Lambda print / edition of 3 / 180 x 120 cm

D.S.M. Mental Health Department

 

The complete exhibition is made up of five sections:

I.      Artefacts, installation by Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo
II.     Photographs by Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo
III.    X Rays by Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo
IV.    Sculptures by Eva Gerd
V.     Drawings by Eva Gerd


Approximately thirty years ago, as a result of the enforcement of the “Psychiatric Reform Law”, better known as the “Basaglia Law”, Italian madhouses were shut down.
The instruments used in surgical operations at such mental health centres constitute the main object of each section of the exhibition. These instruments, mostly dating back to the sixties, were found by the artist at the operation rooms of the few institutions that have been kept closed and untouched ever since.
Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of the surgical instruments are projected over the walls of the spiral structure of the “Artefacts” installation -built as a container of organs. At its center, a human brain in formaldehide stands lit in the dark.
The series of photographs, shot at the desolate spaces of the old mental health institutions, evoke the memory of its former occupants; while the X rays of the instruments, mounted on light boxes, give birth to the process of expansion of memory.
The sound installation blends with the resonance of the wind while passing through the interstices of an old medieval ruin, and the caw of birds that nest in the hollow building.
These modern medical techniches applied to steady objects, transported to the artistic field, establish a counterpoint dialogue with the pencil drawings of Eva Gerd, transforming the instruments in post-organic bodies in continuous evolution.

Each of these rescued objects – coated, sutured and embalmed – rests in a larval state, lying on black satin pillows. With such burial in full sight, the ritual of the metamorphosis of the objects comes to its conclusion. Furthermore  the embedded artistic endeavour also reaches a conclusion. In so doing it reminds of the Platonic theory of ideas and the doctrine of  shapes, where existence is divided into two spheres: that of the “intelligible”of the perfect ideas and shapes, eternal and undivisible; and that of the “sensible”, where concrete and known objects belong.

 

  

Museums & Galleries

DSM
Museo de Arte Contemporáneo AZ
Morelia, Mexico, 2008

Designed, not printed    Lambda print / edition of 3 / 1.20 x 1.80 m    Museo de Arte Contemporáneo AZ, Morelia

DSM catalogue PDF

 

Human Contrasts, Ambiguity and Disturbance

In Gómez de Tuddo’s photographs of mental health premises, life seems to be suddenly pulled out. The remains
– a wheelchair that continues to stare at the light that filters through the window –  everyday object:  toilet paper, slightly unrolled, as if waiting to be used. These build a disturbing image of suspended life, nourished by the echoes of a short story.

Gómez de Tuddo’s photographic compositions evoke intimacy and light, which have been transfigured into demential words of objects immortalized by forgetfulness. These objects are free from the presence of inmates, who never met the camera. Yet they are here, tied, hidden within love letters, or in the vessel containing a brain in formaldehyde, rescued by the photographer from the the ship of fools’ wreck.

Carlos F. Marquez, La Jornada, Michoacán, 2008

 

Los ecos de la locura

Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo se ha dado a la tarea de viajar por el mundo dispuesto a encontrar vida en lo que clínicamente está muerto. Le importa mostrar la belleza en aquello que a primera vista horroriza, o que por violento y cruel nos negamos a mirar.

 Sus fotografías se exhiben en museos, galerías y espacios alternativos en diversos países del mundo. En algunos casos se trata de visiones que muestran la crueldad y la estupidez humanas. En otros, los objetos fotografiados se transforman en una serenidad espectral de hiperrealidad inquietante, mientras que otras son abstracciones de poesía pura. Para exponer gusta de trabajar en formatos grandes (“gigantografías”), en los cuales se pueden apreciar una variedad de detalles, ante los cuales el espectador puede emprender diferentes lecturas.

La muestra “DSM” nos propone una serie de visiones envolventes y elípticas, en las que cada imagen se desdobla de su real iconografía para convertirse, al mismo tiempo, en algo distinto. En este juego poético, donde la imagen siempre deviene metáfora, las imágenes de manicomios abandonados fascinan y perturban: Los apuntes a mesas de cirugías, salones abandonados, pequeños objetos abandonados y mordidos por el tiempo, aparecen como flashes mnemónicos de un recorrido por el inconsciente, el mito y el símbolo.

 Si, como pedía el escritor cubano José Lezama Lima (1910-1976), “la imagen es la causa secreta de la historia”, ya que es el motivo que penetra e impulsa al hombre, las imágenes en el quehacer de Gómez de Tuddo, hacen suya esta premisa y convierten lo aparente en revelación de lo invisible, “lo pasado” en una puerta a la posibilidad.

Demetrio Olivo, La voz de Michoacán, Morelia, 2008

 

Principio de incertidumbre
Universal Forum of Cultures
Centro de las Artes
Curator: Fernando Delmar
Monterrey, Mexico 2007

Participants: Gabriel Orozco, Francis Alys, Demián Flores, Ale de la Puente, Pedro Reyes, Manuel Rocha, Toro Lab, Mario Vargas Lugo, Damián Ortega… 

 

    Universal Forum of Cultures, Centro de las Artes, Monterrey, 2007

 


I. Artefacts – Installation

Artefact     An object produced by human work
Med.         Alteration or distortion of an object which is not part of the object itself

 

Installation Description

A vessel containing a human brain in formaldehide from an abandoned psychiatric hospital stands alone in the middle of a spyral structure, surrounded by a sound installation.
Over the translucid surface of the spyral structure walls, the MRI images of five chirurgical instruments mutate from abstract to tridemensional shapes.
The axial MRI readings are monochromatic, luminiscent projections; while the isometric ones reproduce the instrument’s shape and its artifacts, in constant pendular movement.

Elements

a)  Polycarbonate spyral held by a metallic structure
b)  Human brain in formaldehide
c)  MRI projections
d)  Sound installation

 

Artefacts (Virtual Installation)

Artefacts Sound Installation

 

 

Technical Specifications

a)  Polycarbonate spiral held by a metallic structure
The spiral is made of sixteen polycarbonate pannels (6 m high x 2.80 m wide), held by a metallic structure. Five projectors and six speakers are placed in the upper part of the structure.
When the spiral structure is armed, a white non-reflecting layer is glued to the internal face of the pannels.

b)  Main Work
A black metallic cilindrical stand (1.30 m x .26 m) is placed in the middle of the spiral sturcture. Within the cylinder, a cold light lamp lits the glass vessel containing the human brain in formaldehyde.

c)  MRI Projections
When the DVD player is turned on, five MRIs are simultaneously projected in a loop over the spyral’s internal walls.

d)  Sound Installation
The DVD player and the CD player containing the sound installation CD, must be turned on at the same time.

 

 

   

 Artefact A MRI 3D Video               Artefact B MRI Light Video                                                

 Artefact B MRI 3D Video               Artefact E MRI Light Video

Artefact C MRI 3D Video                    Artefact F MRI Light Video

Artefact D MRI 3D Video

 

 

I. Materials & Equipment

1.  Metallic structure (property of Uroboros-Basilisco)
2.  16 polycarbonate pannels (property of Uroboros-Basilisco)
3.  Five projector and six speaker metallic holders
4.  Five projectors with tilt correction
5.  Six speakers
6.  Five DVD players
7.  One CD player
8.  One cilindrical stand
9.  One cold lamp
10.Non reflecting film
11.Spiral floor carpet and cealing cover
   
 Lambda print / edition of 3 / 1.80 x 1.20 m
  
 
 
 
 

II. Photographs

(edition of 3 / measures without frame)

1. Men’s Ward I, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
180 x 120 cm

3. Strings, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
90 x 60 cm

4. Letters, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
90 x 60 cm

5. Operating Room, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
60 x 90 cm

6. Glove, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
60 x 90 cm

7. Surgical Instruments I, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
40 x 27 cm

8. Surgical Instruments II, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
40 x 27 cm
9. Surgical Instruments III, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
40 x 27 cm

10. Recreation Room, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
90 x 60 cm

11. Men’s Ward II, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
90 x 60 cm

12. Women’s Ward, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
90 x 60 cm

13. Bathroom, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
90 x 60 cm

14. Toilet Paper, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
60 x 90 cm

15. Cold Water Baths Chair, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
60 x 90 cm

16. Main Room II, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
90 x 60 cm
17. Votive Mattress, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
60 x 90 cm

18. Wheelchair, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
60 x 90 cm

19. Extreme Unction Case, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
90 x 60 cm

20. Mortuory Chamber I, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
180 x 120 cm

21. Mortuory Chamber II, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
120 x 180 cm

22. Autopsy Room, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
60 x 90 cm

23. Brains' Closet, 2005
Lambda print, 1/3
120 x 180 cm

III. X-Rays

(edition of  2)

1. Forceps, 2006
X-Ray, 1/2
46 x 53 cm

2. Anaesthetic Vial 2006
X-Ray, 1/2
46 x 53 cm

3. Chisel, 2006
X-Ray, 1/2
46 x 53 cm
4. Hook, 2006
X-Ray, 1/2
46 x 53 cm

5. Pliers, 2006
X-Ray, 1/2
46 x 53 cm

6. Separator I, 2006
X-Ray, 1/2
46 x 53 cm
7. Separator II, 2006
X-Ray, 1/2
46 x 53 cm

8. Syringe, 2006
X-Ray, 1/2
46 x 53 cm

 

x ray light box / edition of 2 / 46 x 53 cm  x ray light box / edition of 2 / 46 x 53 cm  x ray light box / edition of 2 / 46 x 53 cm

 

IV. Sculptures

1. Forceps, 2006
Satin & steel
45 x 30 x 10 cm

2. Anaesthetic Vial, 2006
Satin, steel & glass
45 x 30 x 10 cm

3. Chisel, 2006
Satin & steel
45 x 30 x 10 cm
4. Hook, 2006
Satin & steel
45 x 30 x 10 cm

5. Pliers, 2006
Satin & steel
45 x 30 x 10 cm

6. Separator I, 2006
Satin & steel
45 x 30 x 10 cm
7. Separator II, 2006
Satin & steel
45 x 30 x 10 cm

8. Syringe, 2006
Satin, steel & plastic
45 x 30 x 10 cm


V.   Drawings

(measures without frame)

1. Forceps, 2006
Pencil drawing
29.5 x 42 cm

2. Anaesthetic Vial, 2006
Pencil drawing
29.5 x 42 cm

3. Chisel, 2006
Pencil drawing
29.5 x 42 cm
4. Hook, 2006
Pencil drawing
29.5 x 42 cm

5. Pliers, 2006
Pencil drawing
29.5 x 42 cm

6. Separator I, 2006
Pencil drawing
29.5 x 42 cm
7. Separator II, 2006
Pencil drawing
29.5 x 42 cm

8. Syringe, 2006
Pencil drawing
29.5 x 42 cm


Digital print on cotton paper / edition of 3 / 78 x 65

Tenebræ factæ sunt

 

Hidden within the vaults of the Diocesan Museum of Vicenza, shadows and reflections of religious objects from the oldest civilisations of the world rise from their inmortal sleep with all their ceremonial and ritual power to gather in an ecumenical virtual wunder kamer.

 

Museums & Galleries

Tenebræ factaæ sunt
Museo Diocesano
Curator: Francesco Gasparini
Vicenza, 2009
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
 
 
  
  

 

  


Nahual Dog

 

“The nahual or animal alterego represents the strongest bond between man and nature surrounding him; a kind of insurance against the human forces not capable of giving satisfaction to the constraints of the natural world where he lives and acts, over which the cultivated man has risen but is still attached to…”

“… It is a disjunction from the ‘Me’ that we are (or think we are) towards the other that we also are, and who is always different from us. Disjunction: apparition; experience of the oddity of being human.”

Octavio Paz

 

Sometimes, the augurs of ancient Rome predicted the disasters while painting, and precisely there, among the symbols, people knew how to distinguish the signs of barbarousness, war, decandence and corruption.
(In Mexico, the nahual, human-animal that feeds himself with the reflection of the soul, is a primitive augur that knows what will occur because he lives incorporating dreams and predictions…just like dogs still do).
What we see in this series of terrible images corresponds to a certain kind of magical metempsychosis, where the photographer’s gaze is already an apocalyptical reminder. Through the way he approaches these “beloved” animals called dogs (the same ones that are characters of Victor Hugo, Anton Chekhov, Jack London, Maxim Gorky, Vladimir Nabokov and many others) he is capable of effectively creating “altars of horror”, with all the pathos and sublimation possible only by artists with such a powerful sensitivity. (extract)

Hugo Argüelles

  

Museums & Galleries

No Money No Honey
Arèa -contenitore d’arte contemporanea-
Curator: Antonio Arévalo
Palermo, 2003

Perro-nahual
Roman Forum (Mercati di Trajano)
FotoGrafia, Festival Internazionale di Roma
Curator: Marco Delogu
Rome, 2002

European Festival of Photography
La Station  – with the support of the Municipality of Nice & Villa Arson
Curator: Cédric Teisseire
Nice, 2007

    Lambda print / edition of 3 / .95 x 1.44 m

 


Roman Forum (video)

 

Artwork List & Technical Specifications

Photographs (edition of 3)

1. Mexico City, 2002
Lambda print, 1/3
.95 x 1.44 m

2. Palermo I, 2003
Lambda print, 1/3
.95 x 1.44 m

3. Palermo II, 2003
Lambda print, 1/3
.95 x 1.44 m

4. Vaduz, 2003
Lambda print, 1/3
.95 x 1.44 m

5. Seoul, 2003
Lambda print, 1/3
1.44 x .95 m

6. Morelos, 2002
Lambda print, 1/3
1.44 x .95 m

7. Chimayo, 2003
Lambda print, 1/3
1.44 x .95 m

  

 Lambda print / edition of 3 / .95 x 1.44 m  Lambda print / edition of 3 / .95 x 1.44 m  Lambda print / edition of 3 / .95 x 1.44 m  Lambda print / edition of 3 / 1.44 x .95 m  Lambda print / edition of 3 / 1.44 x .95 m        

Battistery of Volterra, Val di Cecina, Italy, 2008

In mihiyotzin in motlatoltzin

 

The site specific installation, designed for the baptistery of the Duomo of Volterra, includes a visual and a sound installations as well as impromptu audience participation.


From the center of the baptismal font, laser beams raised towards the vault, form two octogonal pyramids united at their base, with their vortex converging in two opposite poles.  

From the eight ogival windows, rise the sound of fragments from the Nican Mopohua*.
 The laser structure which unfolds down from the baptistery’s vault, and the sound installation attracts the audience towards the different sound sources, prompting them to walk around the font in search of the different voices, thus generating audience participation.

The baptistery of Volterra, like many others of its kind, was built over the ruins of an ancient roman temple devoted to a feminine divinity. The twelfth century bulding dominates the Tuscan region of “Villa de Guadalupe”.
 During the Empire of Maximilian of Habsburg, the influential Tangassi family from Volterra was invited to furnish the precious alabaster objects for the Emperor’s Castle of Chapultepec in Mexico City. 
As a result of the miraculous event attributed to the Virgin of Guadalupe, in which the family survived the shipwreck occurred in one of their trips from Mexico to Italy, the whole Tangassy estate was renamed “Villa de Guadalupe”.

Throughout the historical metaphor and the materialization of metaphysic principles, this intervention brings back together two different worlds in an inverted way: Through ethereal tridimensional shapes and a thorough sound architecture, this double installation extracts essential forms of the sacred geometry – implicit in the medieval building, transforming it in a dynamic mechanism, evoking the “apparition” as the manifestation of the hidden shape.


* Sixteenth Century text in Nahuatl, atributed to Juan Valeriano and first written testimony of the apparition of the Tonantzin-Guadalupe divinity at the Tepeyac Hill


In mihiyotzin video Sound Instalation

Plumary

 

 “The work of Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo is a scenario; another aspect of photography. He may photograph whatever he found or add something else to the reality: transform it and then shoot it…”
“…it is a work divided in two parts: The photographs of the feather at the place where it was laid by, and the feather with its tag, which is part of a second composition…”
“…his images are a reflection on death, birds & the dispersion of birds…”

Michel Butor, Università di Roma Tre, 2002

 

Framed Cybachrome print / edition of 1 / 60 x 90 cm Framed bird feather with ID tag

Framed Cybachrome print / edition of 1 / 60 x 90 cm   Framed bird feather with ID tag

 

 

“Introducciones para archivar un pájaro”

Prévert, en su poema “Para hacer el retrato de un pájaro”, hacía algo más que pasar imaginariamente del mundo de la pintura, de las palabras que dicen la pintura, al pájaro: postulaba que para tener un pájaro (para tener en las palabras al pájaro) es necesario pintar una jaula y una vez que ha cumplido su función de atrapar al pájaro, entonces paulatinamente y con cuidado, borrarla. Al final tomar una pluma y firmar. Tal vez el motivo por el que las plumas se convirtieron en occidente en instrumentos de escritura, esté directamente con la presencia abrumadora de los pájaros. Es que las plumas “están en todas partes”, al decir del fotógrafo mexicano Alejandro Gómez de Tuddo, quién decidió registrarlas y construir un plumario. Durante algunos años el artista se dedicó a fotografiar las plumas ahí donde las encontraba, posteriormente las recogía y etiquetaba, consignando lugar y datos. Fecha 21 de diciembre de 2002. Hora 8:45. Lugar: Parque Juárez, México. Título:Desaparecida. Un sello consigno que esa ficha fié realizada por G de Tuddo. Los datos pertenecen al momento y lugar del encuentro, de la pluma que se posa, con restos de sangre, en el rostro de la muchacha. Lo que fotografía Gómez de Tuddo es la pluma en su contexto, en el recorte que su mirada hace de ese contexto antes de retirarla cuidadosamente para conservarla junto a sus datos escritos: archivarla.

La obsesión por la mirada que caracteriza el trabajo de la fotografía,  y en particular de este artista, pone en escena el problema del archivo: cómo atrapar algo de la verdad del pájaro como acontecimiento, sin dejar de señalar la intervención de aquel que, al archivarlo, lo convierte en memoria…

Mónica G. Pené y Graciela Goldchluk, Palabras de Archivo, Introducción, Ediciones UNL, Santa Fé, Argentina
y Centre de Recherches Latino-Americaines, Poitiers, France.

 

Palabras de archivo book cover color